Kirstin Mitchell became known on the Atlanta art scene for her performances as “Kiki Blood,” an alter ego whose appearances resonated with feminist actionism and the American performance art of the 1960s and ’70s. Mitchell recently abandoned that moniker, and her work has taken a material turn, incorporating painting, installation, found objects, and assemblage that nonetheless retain the participatory, voyeuristic quality of her performance work—most likely owing to her use of tactile, unsettlingly inviting materials such as large, thin, powdery sheets of rubber. This winter, she occupied a storefront belonging to the downtown project space Eyedrum, using it as a studio to make and present new and recent work. The result was an evolving, impromptu exhibition experienced through one-on-one appointments and open studio receptions. Mitchell’s mutable installations were stylish but not polished, embracing the appealing crudeness of the space and reflecting the provisional chic of her process-oriented work. - Art in America